Jesus Army Watch   Jesus Army      Watch Jesus Army Watch
  News   Info   Archive   Forum   About


SMALL FARM IS BASE FOR 15M BUSINESS


MANY JESUS FELLOWSHIP MEMBERS HAND OVER THEIR WAGES TO A CENTRAL COFFER HAPPY TO LIVE BY THE SECT'S RULES...


Source : 08/07/2000 Northampton Chronicle and Echo

The small wooden sign emblazoned with New Creation Farm's name is hardly noticeable from the road.

Tucked away in rural Northamptonshire, the 100-acre farm is an unlikely base for a Christian movement which has an annual turnover of 15 million and more than 2,500 members.

A long drive leads past apple orchards before arriving at the farmhouse itself, an imposing building which has been adopted by the sect's leader, Noel Stanton.

The farm itself provides part of the Jesus Fellowship's multi-million pound income, with a shop selling chicken eggs.

Another business, Good Timber, has its base at New Creation Farm, with a converted barn displaying both unturned wood and wood craft for sale.

Northamptonshire accommodates the religious organisation's other business interests, which include Daventry health food outlet Goodness Foods.

The town in west Northamptonshire is home also to Skaino builders and decorators and TBS builders' merchants, while outdoor wear specialists White and Bishop is based in Northampton.

Situated on the outskirts of Nether Heyford, the view from New Creation Farm looks across rolling fields and countryside.

It is an idyllic base for the 40 Jesus Fellowship members who have opted for life in one of the organisation's community houses.

About three-quarters of members have decided on a more traditional approach to Christianity, living on their own and attending services around their daily routines.

But for anyone who has moved into one of the community houses, which can be found in most of England's major towns and cities, the level of dedication is far higher.

These houses provide a life centred around the religious sect's beliefs, where times of worship form an important part of every day.

It is in these communities, which adopt the ethos of communes, that wages are handed over and piled into a central coffer.

Northampton itself has several community houses, many in the heart of the town. But from the outside they look no different, hiding the retreat from the ways of modern living behind closed doors.